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11 May, 2008

Burmese in India collecting relief funds

An email from Mr Kim

I am Kim. We, Burmese in India, start working to collect donation for relief fund for survivors of Nargis..
Our priority to send relief aids are
(1) Cash - we have direct network with Monk Association to transfer, and think safest way to reach to survivors without passing junta...
(2) Medicine- Diseases such as cholera, malaria, diarrhoea and typhoid have been infected..and recommended to supply water purification tablets.

Sasana Moli- International Burmese Monks Organisation is closely working and dealing with the issue..so my suggestion is to discuss with them as well.

I attach our request letter for donation of relief fund...

Relief Fund for Cyclone (Nargis) Survivors in Burma
Appeal for Donations

Burma's "rice basket"—the Irrawaddy delta rice-growing region—was hit by cyclone Nargis on 2 May 2008 leaving more than 1 million people homeless and destruction of 95% of the buildings.
The estimated death toll may be over 100,000 and an estimated 1.9 million people may be vulnerable to water-borne diseases, hunger and lack of clean drinking water. This is considered to be the worst natural disaster to strike Burma since the tsunami hit the region in 2004.
The primary risk following the flooding of the delta region is the outbreak of diseases spread by contaminated water, such as diarrhoea, cholera and typhoid. Stagnant water is providing a breeding ground for bacteria and mosquitoes. Initially, the most likely killer is acute watery diarrhoea, which causes dehydration. Those most at risk are under-fives, the sick, the old and the pregnant. There are already reports of an outbreak of Cholera in the Irrawaddy delta. Other threats include typhoid and hepatitis A, both passed on by contaminated food and water.
Compounding the problem are the efforts of the Burmese military government to frustrate aid actually reaching the vast majority of people affected by the disaster. Though the Burmese government has officially asked for assistance, aid agencies have been reporting that the supplies are being prevented from getting through. Many aid organizations and workers including the UN are being denied visas to enter the country.
At the moment, aid is being allowed from India, China and Thailand apart from the UN Agencies. Other countries are unable to reach essential necessities inside Burma.
Donations in the forms of cash, medicines, water purification tablets and clothes are
appreciated. Your donations in cash will be acknowledged with a receipt and collected at the International Burmese Monks Association. The first dispatch of all donations is on 17 May 2008.
Your support is urgently needed. Please join to help the cyclone survivors by your kind contribution through "Relief Fund for Cyclone Survivors in Burma (India)."
Please contact for further information to:
• Mr. Kim at Ph: +91-9810476273, Email: reliefcyclonesurvivorsinburma@gmail.com
or
• The Other Media, B5/136, Safdarjung Enclave, ND, Contact: Sahana Basavapatna at +91 11 2610 5472, +91 11 2853 5860 and +91 99682 96202, Email: Sahana.basavapatna@gmail.com

Sincerely,

Kim

Coordinator
Relief Fund for Cyclone (Nargis) Survivors in Burma (India)

Committee for Relief Fund for Cyclone (Nargis) Survivors in Burma (India) concerns the Burmese and Indian activists to ensure that much needed humanitarian aid reaches the survivors.



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3 Comments Post a Comment
Anonymous Anonymous said :

I'm mindful that you may have very specific local knowledge, but Medical supply is almost invariably best left to the major international organizations. Before even thinking about collecting and sending medicines, I think it might be extremely helpful if you had a look at the following review on the Journal of Humanitarian Assistance, and perhaps shared it with your colleagues:

Drug Donations in Emergencies, the Sri Lankan Post-tsunami Experience

By Rafal Hechmann and Anne Bunde-Birouste (Sept 2007)

http://jha.ac/2007/09/26/drug-donations-in-emergencies-the-sri-lankan-post-tsunami-experience/

There is almost always huge oversupply, vast waste, and great expense in coping with unwanted pharmaceuticals. You will almost certainly do far better staying with cash.

11 May, 2008 11:11  
Anonymous Anonymous said :

what about other essentials.. canned food / blankets / clothes/ hygiene products etc? would you need these?

11 May, 2008 13:48  
Anonymous Anonymous said :

It is a good thing to help the needy, always a good thing. But one thing, I noticed the second comment and must say that those things are certainly NEEDED.

I applaud that you are helping other people.

11 May, 2008 23:21  

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